forge and foundry



  • Realized i was hijackin another thread so i will start one on forge and foundry.



  • Here is the foundry i made for melting aluminum. I have not used it yet because i cant get a nice casting sand . My Own recipe was too weak.if anyone could help me find some greensand or petrobond i would be greatful. Thanks for looking


  • Member

    Did you make or purchase the torch?



  • http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/threads/tech-make-a-bellhousing-out-of-an-old-intake-manifold.464599/#post-5120514

    I copied from this thread on the hamb and made the torch and my own fire clay . Casting sand recipe is very close to the fire clay but mine wasn’t cutting it. I found a place in surrey called oclim

    http://www.oclim.com/

    that carries green sand but i never get chance to get some. Last research i did oclim has an outlet in the loops. A.d.d. got the better of me and i dropped the ball.



  • http://www.oclim.com/metal-casting.html

    Here is the link for casting products we conversed about tonight. If anyone wants to combine an order for greensand I’m in.



  • Sounds like an interesting project to work on. I might be able to pitch in or help out.


  • Linux

    I don’t know much about what’s needed for this, but if the sand needs a ride from Surrey, let me know?

    Learning and working on learning more!

    1


  • I know this is an old thread, I am new to the forum. I just thought I would touch base.

    fine silica sand can be found almost anywhere, building material stores etc. there are few other ingredients, the internet has many recipes. I feel the key is the mulling system, here’s some instructions.

    http://www.backyardmetalcasting.com/guest_georgemuller02.html



  • I have some silicone impregnated sand that I’m going to try for casting. I also have a tiny clay graphite crucible, and a test-piece printed in 3% infill PLA. Probably try a tiny casting this week. Can’t do it at the space, because of insurance problems, so I’ll do the cast off-site and bring in the results for discussion. At some point, I’d like to set up for tiny scale cast-iron work using the thermite casting process. Jake is well familiar with it.



  • castings.jpg

    Here’s some fun stuff i was working on a few days ago.
    I’m super excited about it.



  • I thought a few of your would be interested in this video:

    http://speedsociety.com/railroad-thermite-welding-up-close-and-personal/?source=amazing



  • I was just reading online that you can get microwave kilns. They can make small items in an ordinary microwave. So far I’ve seen people cast metals, fuse glass, and glaze ceramics. Here is an example of a glass one. http://www.paragonweb.com/MagicFuse.cfm



  • @Jacob-S Definitely not in Canada scary lack of PPE and supervisors. How can work possibly get done without at least two coffee breaks in that amount of time ?



  • @Nicholas said:

    @Jacob-S Definitely not in Canada scary lack of PPE and supervisors. How can work possibly get done without at least two coffee breaks in that amount of time ?

    Not true. One guy had safety glasses… on top of his head.
    Interesting technique. I gather that’s for a high-speed train. Since, we don’t seem to bother welding tracks together for regular trains.



  • No, that kind of welding is still done on the mainline track here in Canada. It is a slower process than Holland Arc Welding, but it creates a stronger weld.



  • We were discussing crucible ideas last week and had a couple of easy options. One was half of a propane torch. The other was half of a propane bottle. I did some research and found that while those were adequate it would be better to use a clay crucible. Rather than spending $50 on one I found a recipe. http://m.instructables.com/id/Clay-Crucible-Recipes/?ALLSTEPS



  • Thermite welding is in fact still performed on mainline…



  • I’ve got a book somewhere that spends some time on rammed grog crucibles. But my knowledge of ceramics is scant and I’m not sure that I’d trust anything I fired myself to not have the bottom fall out when I pick up a pot of molten metal…

    When it comes down to cost/risk analysis, if we decide that ceramic is the way to go, I think I can afford to drop 50 bucks on a manufactured unit rather than trying it out with something where I have no way to tell if it is riddled with uncured material or internal fractures and stresses that will show under heat and pressure. Maybe I’m just chicken because the thought of splashing myself with molten aluminum makes me uncomfortable.



  • The safety gear recommended was the same gear you would use for welding. A big silver fire suit would be cool though



  • @Keerf said:

    Thermite welding is in fact still performed on mainline…

    Still done in electrical too . Welding grounds together ,industrial mostly.


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