Big shout-out to two of our recent sponsors



  • 0_1467922357750_P_20160706_182656.jpg
    I caught @n0pe yesterday in the hack room, working together with the Tusk Automation crew – all familiar faces around Kamloops Makerspace. I just wanted to give a big shout out to both groups. @James-TuskAuto donated 500$ :moneybag: to us very recently as soon as they heard we might have a bit of financial problems.
    @n0pe has also been connecting us with Savona Specialty Plywood. They are the ones that donated all those aluminium sheets and the giant inview marquee LED sign that we were all excited about yesterday (yes it is working now!).

    This is the kind of relation we need to build with local companies. It is a lot more than the typical sponsorship. We provide a non competitive environment for all technology and creative companies to work on interesting and challenging projects together, do some R&D or just have some fun. Another value I know the companies that support us are looking for is finding talent. When they get involved they can see people in action and find people with the right skills to hire.

    There are several other companies that we have a similar relationship with which I think is really valuable. I just wanted to post this because I was happy to see that yesterday. Keep up the great work everyone!



  • Thanks, @arasbm. I will pass it along to the plant manager here!



  • This is so awesome! Great news. Congrats everyone. :star2:



  • @n0pe SSP makes this stuff I think?

    Durable and Attractive: Phenolic-Faced Plywood
    As I was looking around for plywood to use for someshop projects, 
    I found something that’s almost ideal. Iwondered why I hadn’t noticed it before. It’s a unique
    product —— phenolic-faced plywood. If you look at the photos below, you’ll see whatlooks like 
    Baltic birch plywood with a thin coating onthe faces. This tough coating is a plastic material (phenolic) over Finnish birch (exterior grade) plywood. What I found out was that it was originally engi—neered for concrete forms. its coating was designed towithstand the abrasion and moisture from concrete. Great for Jigs and Hbrtures. Durability anor less friction make this an ideal product for lots of shop uses. www.ShopNotes.com And since this coating is slippery, it releases from theconcrete easily. This plywood has great properties formaking jigs and fixtures — durability and low-friction.An extra benefit is that it looks great, too. Manufacturers make this product available in avariety of colors and thicknesses, but I had a hard timefinding retail sources for it. The good news is thatWoodcraft carries this specialty plywood. It’s availablein 2'x4' sheets in 1/2" and 3/4" thicknesses in a green colorlike you see in the photos (see Sources). I’m sure you’llfind lots of uses for it in the shop.
    

    The quote is from ShopNotes Issue 87 page 10… I’ve been looking for a source for Phenolic Faced Plywood for some time, based on the article. Do they sell it retail through anyone local? It seems like the perfect solution to many of my material selection problems.



  • We don’t have any local suppliers but I will chat with you at the space about potential options.

    I’ll run the description you listed by our mill tech and ask him which product we make best fits the bill. I know what you’ve described sounds familiar but we make a multitude of overlayed panels.



  • I’ll arrange for you to get a copy of the issue… It makes more sense in the not cut-n-paste version.



  • I’ve attached a PDF with pages 10 and 11 from issue 87:
    0_1467936744263_87-pg-10-11.pdf


  • Electric

    Thanks @arasbm !



  • @n0pe brought in samples of several types of plywood that they make at his mill… They’re all very interesting. Once we have some MSDS goodness going on, I’d be very interested in working out a deal to buy some for many projects.

    If we can’t laser it, I’d try CNC routing it. At this point, I’m pretty much set on the idea of getting some 1/8" with that slick phenolic face, and making a torsion box skinned with the stuff. Then building a knock-down table with adjustable height. It’d be amazing for infeed/outfeed or glue-up table for many different things.


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