Where to buy Arduino hardware



  • I know there are millions of places to buy Arduino hardware but where YOU buy your Arduino’s from???

    I’m looking at doing a small project with an Arduino Uno and a single stepper motor (and stepper driver of course).

    I’ve been looking around and Robotshop.ca seems like the best price compared to american shops (no $ conversion!!) and shipping cost should be better since it’s Canadian.

    Has anyone found a better source !?!

    jason


  • 3D

    I buy mine in China. After I tried using a pro mini for one of my projects, I couldn’t go back. I got a serial-to-usb adapter instead of having a USB on each arduino – this saves extra dollar for every device. Also, pro minis are little bit smaller than any other arduinos which make them perfect for protable or compact projects. But of course, nothing will beat @Ron_Ron 's attiny85s:-D
    Aliexpress is your place. ~$1.60. Quality is okay, so far I’ve only seen one bad batch @MIPS brought in:-D To be fair, I must say we’ve managed to fix 4\5 bad boards.



  • If you are driving just one stepper. I would recommend an easy driver.



  • As mentioned I’ve always bought from china through ebay…which sometimes comes with its quirks. At around $2.50 each with free shipping it never hurts to buy five or ten of them and get them int he mail about a month later. You can even get Uno clones for $1.28 each with free shipping. If you want I can show you when I come in tomorrow night.



  • If time is a factor, then I typically order from solarbotics.com (in Calgary), leeselectronic.com (Vancouver), or rpelectronics.com (Burnaby).

    robotshop.ca (Montreal) stocks alot of the sparkfun products as well (I think lees and RP also carry a decent selection as well).

    EDIT: fixed lees electronics link,


  • Linux

    I borrowed one from @sireatalote for a long time, and had been gifted someones unused one by the time he needed it back. Since then, I’ve collected a few and would be happy to lend/give you one if you’re just starting on a project… pay it forward and all that…

    Learning and working on learning more!

    0


  • Thanks everyone for the great links and ideas !!

    I’m not in a rush to get my project started (yet ;-) so i checked out the links.

    The link to Lee’s has a slight typo. This one will work:
    leeselectronic.com

    I decided to check out the prices for two items that I’m looking at and thought that I would report back. I found it interesting and thought someone else would too.

    Store - UnoR3 - A4988 - Total
    Solarbotics $39.76 - $8.76 - $48.52
    Lee’s $33.00 - $7.95 - $40.95
    RP $31.95 - $0 - $31.95
    Robotshop $22.79 - $5.95 - $28.74

    Thanks again everyone !!

    Jason



  • Lees and Main Electronics are fantastic shops to buy your parts and components from whenever you are down on the coast. Better yet they are both on the same block visiting both is easy. A lot of my radio and TV restoration components regularly come from Main who will also ship if you buy $25 or more in components.



  • Please remember solarbotics has helped the space in the past and offers discounts for bulk buys from maker spaces.

    Just food for though.



  • @trunner has a very good point… I’ve never bought an Arduino from SolarBotics, but when I lived in Calgary, I bought my lathe, and a whole lot of Sherline tooling from them. They design and make kits for breakout of many interesting components.

    This one is my standout favorite:
    https://solarbotics.com/product/k_cmd/

    It lets you run a pair of significant motors with PWM from a couple of pins on your microcontroller… With a bit of modification, and some heat sinking, I had mine driving a cordless drill with serious torque. The back-emf pulses of a motor/gearbox like that usually make the blue smoke come out of your microcontroller when you put real load on.

    Looking at the site, I think I need to try playing with these boards:
    https://solarbotics.com/product/50650/
    They replace the brains inside a servo with a microcontroller that speaks i2c… Then you can control many servos off just two pins. Instead of dedicating cycles on your cpu to making precise PWM waveforms, you go “Move to 4 degrees” and it will do it. You can also query the current position of the servo… So you can say “Power yourself down” move the arm where you want it, and store that information. Later on you can go “move back to that location” Very exciting.


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