The Peachy Printer comes to the Kamloops Makerspace



  • Hi Everyone !

    As many of you know I have a few Peachy Printers.
    I also have a few projects lined up for them (enhancing them and using them).

    I need your help !

    There are 3 things I’m trying to do:

    1. Assemble my remaining 3 peachy printers. I could bring them to the space and we could assemble them together!
      @Pierre Don’t you have a beta unit?? Bring it and we can assemble it !

    2. Laser cut a new Build Container for the Peachy. I have a design “mostly” complete in Inkscape. This will be MUCH better than the default 2L pop bottle. I should be able to cut 5 boxes with lids from one sheet. That’s enough for my 4 and Pierre’s beta unit.
      @arasbm Do you have any of those Acrylic sheets left??
      I want one !!! What size were they?

    3. Do a print demo of the Peachy !!

    I’m also building a stepper based Z-Axis for the Peachy but I need more parts. I’m sure we could toss around design ideas for that as well.

    …and here’s the good part…

    I will donate One Peachy and One Acrylic build container to the Makerspace for your help on these projects !!

    I’m excited to get started !!
    How does Thursday at 6:30pm this week sound for Peachy assembly !?
    I hope to see you there !!!

    Jason



  • Hi @Jason ! Thursday at 6:30 would be a great time.
    I used up a big chunk of my acrylic for the infinity cube, but there is still lots left to make containers!

    Looking forward to the workshop! :smile:



  • I don’t have a peachy, my boss was on the kickstarter and got a beta unit that never got set up.

    Are you planning on using a stepper-driven pump to feed the Z, or some more radical change to the design? If you are trying to eliminate the acoustic pickup to detect the drops falling I have a peristaltic pump you might try… It should provide a dead consistent flow rate off pwm control.

    How is the uncured resin going to react in contact with acrylic? PET (which pop bottles are made of) is relatively non-reactive… I’d be tempted to try a polyethelene 5-gallon bucket or a polypro laundry tub… Polypro is very difficult to dissolve, and they ship the stuff in PE bottles. I’ve been unable to locate an MSDS on makerjuice, but I’d assume it contains some powerful solvents based on the smell. I’m actually sort of hesitant to build an acrylic enclosure and fill it with liquid at all, since we don’t seem to have solvent welds in acrylic dialed in super consistently. All I can picture is a few gallons of salt water and resin ending up everywhere:)

    @arasbm @Nicholas @Bradley-Maker and @fullmetalmaker should probably chime in here if there is something I have missed re: solvent welding acrylic water-tight boxes… The last thing I was involved with solvent welding up (light bar for grow lamps) popped apart with gentle pressure in several places.



  • I don’t have a peachy, my boss was on the kickstarter and got a beta unit that never got set up.

    Maybe he wants to donate it to the MakerSpace :->

    Are you planning on using a stepper-driven pump to feed the Z, or some more radical change to the design?

    Yes, a more radical change. I will be using a threaded rod turned by a stepper. The Build platform will be firmly connected to a nut that is threaded on the rod and thus will move up or down based on the direction the rod is turned. This will abandon the dripper system completely. The dripper system is an AWESOME Lowest Cost design. It’s time for a Highest Quality design.

    If you are trying to eliminate the acoustic pickup to detect the drops…

    The Peachy does not use acoustics, it uses an open wire switch. The salt water drop closes the switch and the drop is counted by the software.

    How is the uncured resin going to react in contact with acrylic?

    Very excellent question! I will bring my resin and we can test it on a scrap of acrylic.

    I’ve been unable to locate an MSDS on makerjuice, but I’d assume it contains some powerful solvents based on the smell.

    I’m currently using FTD Snow White resin and it came with some “safety” paperwork. I will find it and bring it.

    All I can picture is a few gallons of salt water and resin ending up everywhere… :)

    Yeah… I’m worried about that too. I don’t really care what it’s made of really. It just needs to be transparent and hopefully cheap :-) There just happened to be some acrylic available.



  • We also have glass. I have some experience with aquariums that are built of glass panes bonded with silicone at the edges… There is some makerjuice at the space for @dhylands iBox nano… I can put a few drops onto some scraps of silicone and acrylic tonight and see what they look like in the morning. I know it won’t dissolve glass, because the reservoir on the nano is a glass petri dish.

    The real advantage of the dripper system is actually that it has variable and potentially very high z-axis resolution… As your tank size increases, if the drip size is maintained constant, the thickness of each z step decreases. This makes for a super cheap way to produce silky smooth 3d prints. A single drop of water added to a 2l bottle might raise the water level by 0.1mm… but that same drop added to a 50 gallon drum would raise the water level by a much smaller distance. Since the resin is floating on the water this makes for a very easy system to scale up. Trying to get a similar resolution in a stepper-based system involves gearing the motor down, but that requires backlash compensation. The iBox nano uses a geared stepper to get z resolution. Trust me when I say that using the cheap geared steppers that they used is not a best-quality approach… It has layers that are comparable to our FDM printer’s layers, but it needs to lift the build plate about an inch and lower it back down to hit a 0.3mm step.



  • **There are so many quirks, issues and inconsistencies with the dripper system I don’t even know where to start.
    I will say this: It has driven me to build a better Build Container/Z-Axis system/Resin Management system. I look forward to a lively conversation :-) **

    We also have glass.
    I have considered glass but have been hesitant. Whatever gets built will need to be scrubbed out with dish soap after each use. Will it be practical to put that in the kitchen sink after every print?

    There is some makerjuice at the space for @dhylands iBox nano… I can put a few drops onto some scraps of silicone and acrylic tonight and see what they look like in the morning.

    Cool !

    The real advantage of the dripper system is actually that it has variable and potentially very high z-axis resolution…

    True!

    “if the drip size is maintained constant…”

    Unfortunately, this doesn’t work out in reality. The faster the drops come out the smaller they are. The slower they come out the bigger they are. It could be calibrated but a lot of testing would be required. Currently, the Peachy’s drip/syphon system also changes speed as the levels of the water change. This means that the drip bottle needs to be raised slightly to maintain the drip. When it’s raised the drip speed spikes. If it spikes too much, the Z-axis will over run the print and the software will compensate by SKIPPING the layer it is trying to draw. I have some FANTASTIC print fails that show this really well.

    Trust me when I say that using the cheap geared steppers that they used is not a best-quality approach.

    I would love to hear your experience with this !

    It needs to lift the build plate about an inch and lower it back down to hit a 0.3mm step.

    Thankfully, the stepper Z-Axis on the Peachy would not need to do this Lift and Dip action, thus, substantially reducing the motion of the build platform.



  • You could add the water with a calibrated pump. We used a syringe system to push air into a vital to extract a measured volume back out of that vital



  • I had a solution to your slicing problem. The programs available only slice down to .2mm and the Peachy prints layers .02mm thick. Why not stretch the model by 10x on the vertical axis only just before slicing? The printer will unstretch the model during the printing process.



  • Excellent thought… because this is exactly what is required to make Cura work. This is not possible in Slic3r because this size of object overflows it’s 32-bit nature and crashes.

    While we’re on the topic, if anyone can tell me how to get Cura (v15.04.6) to display and print rafting, I would be most pleased !!!

    Further to all of the “how to make the dripper system work better” discussion from last night, here is a 3D printable scissor jack from Thingiverse. It prints as ONE PIECE as is fully functional right off of the print bed !!
    http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:925556
    It may be a super simple way to smoothly raise the drip container to maintain drip speed without spikes.

    I will start doing some testing ;-)



  • For preference I always prefer to keep fluids in some sort of suspended bucket or jug with a handle and raise/lower with a variation on a winch… Balancing a container on a platform that pushes it up seems more prone to spillage than hanging it from a rope.



  • I had an idea for a more accurate drop counter. The drop sizes with the existing system keep changing because the flow rate changes.
    My idea is to use an IV drip chamber. By suspending the fluid bag above the work there won’t be changes to the flow rate from repositioning the siphon.
    The next step would be to place an IR led and receiver at 90 degrees to each other mounted at the drip chamber. The receiver would only see the IR when a drop was in place. This would let the Peachy count the drops.


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