Cutting angled cuts with the laser cutter.


  • Member

    Cutting a 30° mitered edge using the laser cutter. It be a wee bit tricky and a bit of a guessing game lining it up. But it is possible!
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  • Member

    Can confirm that krankin is killing it on the laser, I saw these last night really cool stuff!



  • Dude. that’s crazy. I’m assuming one X/Y cut at a time, correct? I don’t think that laser has provisions to adjust the Z axis during a cut?


  • Member

    @n0pe correct. Each cut had to be made separately. Which meant putting a new piece on the jig, lining up and setting up the origin between each cut. Side note. The visible laser isn’t actually on the origin. It’s offset by a few mm on the x and y axis. So I would use the laser to line up the jig on a cut line I etched when cutting the pre-mitered pieces, but then had to offset the origin by eye. Which worked good enough for the most part. But sometimes I was off and it didn’t cut in the right place. Thinking of accounting for the offset on the next cuts.



  • Nice. I’ve used the “pulse” function quite a bit when trying to line things up. I think with the material sitting higher on the bed like this it would be take a bit of ingenuity to use it, though. Cool idea either way!


  • Member

    @n0pe I probably should of used the pulse more. I used it to figure out the offset to begin with, but was just eye-balling the offset for the actual cut. Notes for next time.


  • Member

    The finished product. A candle stand.
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  • Member

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  • Member

    How many branches you got left ? :P


  • Member

    @derpko no more losses. That protective box has helped a lot


  • Classroom

    In order to ensure that your cuts are square to either the X or Y axis of the laser travel you could do a pulse cut using the controls to cut a straight line into a piece of scrap that has been weighed down with heavy weights to ensure it doesn’t move. Then you could butt your jig up to one side of the cut materials (which won’t have moved because of the weights. As long as the jig is square on that side, and the material sits in the jig square the cut will be perfectly square on the face of the material. Adds a couple steps but it should be very precise and in the long run easier than trying to eyeball. Great work on the jig @Krankin!


  • Member

    @kile was thinking the exact same thing about using the pulse function. The jig was actually light enough to be moved a little from the air supply. I had to weigh it down with some little offcuts. Might try making a wider jig to hold multiple pieces per cut, also helping with making them more consistent.



  • The machine also has an unused axis output… For mounting a rotary head. To engrave the surface of round objects. It is pretty far down my todo list to build one and interface it to the software, but in theory you could also set up a single axis sine table and send commands to the machine to change the angle mid-cut. The hardware is also capable of changing z-depth mid cut. RDWorks unfortunately does not seem to support it, but that just means reverse engineering the protocol and writing some better software.

    I’d love to have a way to have it move Z to change the focus during the cut to do crazy calligraphic burns.


  • Member

    @pierre that would be extremely cool to get that working, Until then, i can improve my jig technique.


  • Design Lab

    @pierre the capability to precisely change z-axis during cutting also facilitates ‘oragami’ in plexi, as the out of focus lasing is used to heat bend corners. it can be done manually, as well, but being able to tell the laser to go out of focus on a certain coloured line would open up a whole new dimension.


  • Design Lab


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