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  • Lawrence

    @Vaughn
    Vaughn, can I be added to the wait list? I thought I was on the wait list for this one…

    :-)

    Lawrence

    posted in Workshops read more
  • Lawrence

    Sure, Vaughn, just need to find time this week. Tuesday sounds like it could be good. What would be a good time?

    posted in Tools and Space read more
  • Lawrence

    When I used the machine last I found that the oil was not dripping down through the little window in the front of the machine, even when I ran it fast. I do not know how oil pumps work in these machines, but I understand from the instructions that the oil is always supposed to be moving through the window. I checked the oil level and it seems to be fine, so there may be something wrong with the pump. The oil pump looks like this:

    0_1491523137033_image.png

    posted in Tools and Space read more
  • Lawrence

    Okay, so Rudy and I have had a talk about this machine. Basically, Rudy points out that this is not really a heavy-duty machine as it does not have a walking foot. It was probably designed to do light, straight work fast, like draperies or something like that with long, straight stitching. So it is fast but does not do thick. In this way it is “heavy-duty” in terms of durability of parts, etc, but not in terms of the materials that it can sew. The speed of the machine and it being suited to long straight seams does make it a bit difficult to use for smaller projects. We discussed that it should have a needle guard for safety. Something like this:
    0_1491522480807_Sewing-Machine-Foot-with-Needle-Guard_MAIN-1.jpg

    Will help to keep people from running over their own fingers when the speed gets away from them. Oops, that one is built-in to the foot, so maybe this would be a suitable add-on:
    0_1491522588676_Industrial-sewing-machine-accessories-car-sewing-machine-needle-guard-to-prevent-finger-needle-hit-hand-safety.jpg_640x640.jpg
    Maybe I could bend one of these myself out of wire.

    Hope this helps.

    posted in Tools and Space read more
  • Lawrence

    I used the machine last night for a small leather project and to get a feel for it. i have also texted Rudy to get his feedback on the set-up. I will write a synopsis of any issues that we have found and post it here. For now, it does no harm to adjust the clutch sensitivity as noted in the video I posted above, “a better control of speed of a sewing machine, part II”. Then if we decide we want to further this by trying a cam as Grant suggested, above, then we can consider that too.

    posted in Tools and Space read more
  • Lawrence

    Thank you for the gasket material, Pierre

    posted in Tools and Space read more
  • Lawrence

    Re step-down pulley system, see:

    Talks about replacing clutch motor with servo type (seems expensive) then walks through pulley system step-down.

    Also here:

    However, if you look here:

    at the 4:08 mark of the video, it talks about the lubrication system. The automatic lube of the machine requires it to run at nearly full speed in order for the pump to work to lube the top of the machine. So after stepping it down, we should make sure that the oil still drips through that little window.

    So this may be a better option to consider here:

    where he merely lengthens the arm of the motor control (not sure how/if that would work on our singer) in order to fine-tune the speed control, without gearing it/slowing it down.

    I will have a look tonight when I am there.

    L.

    posted in Tools and Space read more
  • Lawrence

    Thanks, Pierre. I was looking to replace the top gasket in that machine. Not sure the thickness, but just about anything under 2 mm should work.

    posted in Tools and Space read more
  • Lawrence

    Does anyone have sheet gasket (cork)?

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  • Lawrence

    Thanks, Pierre.

    Thinking that this machine running so fast is a common problem, I thought that maybe singer made alternative flywheels that could be swapped out. Don’t think so.

    Then I thought that maybe using a lathe to cut another flywheel, either out of stacked plywood or aluminum, and replacing the existing one with a larger diameter might be doable.

    0_1490805258529_Capture flywheel.JPG
    The belt rides over the t4 screws

    I have no idea if this is much more difficult than adding a jackshaft, because I have done neither.

    I see that other people have this problem too. See here:

    https://blog.adafruit.com/2007/11/08/hacking-an-industrial-sewing-machine-by-adjusting-the-clutch-motor/

    posted in Tools and Space read more